Ep 54. Your Success WTMS Infra-Structure (Part 1)
With so many powerful improvement methods available, why do so many fail—and fail early? One main reason is: Companies have not put an improvement infrastructure in place prior to launch. There is no framework for success.

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This week, your host and visual workplace expert, Gwendolyn Galsworth, shares six behind-the-scenes elements that ensure the success of your WTMS (Work That Makes Sense) deployment. These need to be in place on the macro-level before the launch: 1) vision place (to keep the initiative on course); 2) systematic methodology/WTMS; 3) excellent training materials; 4) onsite leadership (“3-Legged Stool”); 5) laminated map; and 6) official improvement time policy. Today’s show details the first four, with special emphasis on the 3-Legged Stool, comprised of the Management Champion (who resources/protects WTMS), WTMS Coordinator (in charge of scheduling, logistics, and deployment) and the Steering Team (a group of volunteer value-add associates). Tune in/learn more.

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Ep 53. The Three Outcomes: How Visuality Defines Success
What does improvement success mean? What goals are universally relevant, making your improvement efforts worth the investment? Today, Gwendolyn Galsworth resumes her march through her prize-winning book, “Work That Makes Sense (WTMS).”

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Now on Chapter 3, she defines the three outcomes that all visual transformation targets. Outcome 1: Achieve a Visual Showcase, a work area that demonstrate high-performance visual performance. Outcome 2: Achieve trackable, bottom line results. Visuality does not attack KPIs directly. Instead, it focuses on transforming the physical environment so that struggle evaporates, and flow not only accelerates but is visually controllable. As a result, KPIs that need to increase, do so—and those that need to decrease, do that. Outcome 3 is to adopt an attitude of learning. As people implement WTMS, they change the process and change themselves in the process—including their thinking and sometimes even their attitudes. That’s what success means in WTMS.

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Ep 52. Beware of Borg: Standards, Standardization & Standard Work
Do you pursue standards, standard work, and standardization as the bedrock to repeatable, precise, and predictable outcomes? Yes, all three words contain “standard” in them; but it is a mistake to use them interchangeably.

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They are not the same. To think so is to radically limit the contribution each can make to operational excellence. Add to that a parallel misunderstanding about “visual standards” and you have a cognitive and deployment trap of the first order. The trap is the mistaken notion that if we make everything the same, we will a) ensure that the right thing will be done again and again; and b) attain the triple win of repeatability, repeatability, and sustainability. This is not true. Listen as Gwendolyn cautions you to resist this form of Borg thinking. Be careful not to swallow the marketing when you bite into your love of “standards.” Get your terms right and definitions clear. Resistance is not only not futile, it is mission critical. Beware of Borg!

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Ep 51. Value Field & Motion Metrics: New Habits of Mind
Is operator-led visuality about thinking or doing? Answer: It is a system of thinking first, then a system of doing. This week, Gwendolyn Galsworth completes her discussion of the eight building blocks of visual thinking with the final two elements: value field and motion metrics.

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When your associates can define their value field, they begin to understand the balance point between moving and work—and moving and struggle. Dr. Galsworth illustrates through a mini case study of 17 grandmothers who began their visual conversion in a semi-conductor bonding cell in just that way. Couple that with motion metrics and your company has a powerful way for operators to define and measure their struggle, identify with their area KPIs, and own their behavior. Associates realize that, in a non-visual workplace, their hands, feet, and mouths constantly seek the vital information they need but can never find. Learn how the building blocks cultivate new habits of mind and let the workplace speak.

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Ep 50. Info Deficits: Questions Asked But Never Answered
When the outcome is excellence, what’s not to love? This week, Gwendolyn Galsworth continues her walk through her Shingo award-winning book, Work That Makes Sense—specifically Chapter 2: Eight Building Block of Visual Thinking.

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After she re-caps visual standards (Building Block 2), she presents the six core questions (Building Block 3): Where? What? When? Who? How Many? and How? When the answers to any, many or all of these six questions are incomplete, inaccurate, hard to find, or simply not there, the result is the negative performance environment called “the pre-visual workplace.” This is a workplace flooded with information deficits—and, therefore, flooded with mistakes, mis-steps, and danger. Info deficits (Building Block 4) are invisible by definition—findable only by their footprint: motion/moving with working (Building Block 5). Motion is the struggle that leads to bad performance, danger, a de-moralized workforce, and managers/supervisors whose only weapon is firefighting.

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Ep 49. Work That Makes Sense: 5S is about Compliance, not Development
What the difference between operator-led visuality—Work That Makes Sense— and 5S? Is it such a big deal anyway? This week Gwendolyn Galsworth, author of the Work That Makes Sense book and her Online Training System of the same name, gives the low-down on why she wrote the book.

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Making sharp contrast between WTMS and traditional 5S, she notes: “5S is about compliance and the proper relationship between work and dirt.” White-glove cleanliness and order anchored in lines and labels mean employees do better work because they feel safe. WTMS achieves that—plus a stable, spirited, contributing, and engaged workforce. Listen as Gwendolyn delves deeper into i-Driven visuality in the second driving question: “What Do I Need to Share.” Hear how it generates concentric circles of connectivity—and builds servant-leadership amongst hourly employees. Learn her “First-Question-Is-Free Rule;” apply it in the morning. This show also introduces Standards, the second Building Block of Visual Thinking.

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Ep 48. You Go First: Ideas, Tolerance, and i-Driven Visuality
Where is the “we” in visuality’s first driving question “What Do I Need to Know?” Where are the teams? This week, Gwendolyn Galsworth discloses the genius of visuality’s second driving question, “What Do I Need to Share,” revealing the power of the Work That Makes Sense methodology to inspire, inform, connect, engage, and align.

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WTMS is a new way of thinking and performing for operators. Listen as Galsworth shares her “You Go First” protocol that shifts operators into tolerance when patience is too far to reach. Fears about associate-led change can trigger a lot of commotion in executives as they face their company’s true work culture—even as i-driven visuality helps those same associates cultivate courage, curiosity, and discovery. The benefits can be enormous. In one company, 200 i-driven operators freed up a mere five minutes/day by eliminating info deficits through visual thinking. The multiplied impact? The liberation of 31,890 work hours in one year. Let the workplace speak!

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Ep 47. Benefits & Building Block 1: The Need-to-Know (4)
What are the benefits of making the workplace speak? What drives visual work inventions that result? In this week’s show, your host and visual expert, Gwendolyn Galsworth, describes the seven benefits of workplace visuality.

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Benefit 3/the practicality of visual thinking itself. Visuality is not merely about abnormal vs. normal; it’s about increasing flow by minimizing struggle. Benefit 4/the power of making a partner out of the physical work environment. When you give a voice to inanimate objects through visuality, you come to expect more from them—and they deliver more. “Expect more from the floor,” she says, “ than merely holding you up.” Hear how world-famous composer, Philip Glass and Gwen’s brother, Gary, (both NYC plumbers in their youth) got ornery pipes to loosen up—when Glass sang to them. Then Gwendolyn launches the eight Building Blocks of Visual Thinking, starting with the Need-To-Know, the foundation of i-driven visuality and an opportunity to establish tolerance at work.

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Ep 46. A Workforce of Visual Thinkers: A Scan of the 10 Doorways (3)
Is it enough for value-add associates in your company to become visual thinkers? Is that what it takes to let the workplace speak?

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No matter how many line employees invent and implement splendid visual solutions, they represent only part of who needs to learn how to think visually. True success in visuality means that every organizational level learns to create visual devices. This week, your host and visual expert, Gwendolyn Galsworth, adds to her discussion of her Work That Makes Sense book as she scans her 10-Doorway Model so you can understand for yourself how everyone—from buyers to engineers, planners to machinists, supervisors to CEOs—can learn to make the workplace speak. From visual displays to visual standards, visual metrics to visual problem solving, visual pull systems to the visual control of material, and visual quality to poka-yoke systems, imagine what it would mean for your company to become a fully-functioning visual enterprise. Imagine what it would mean for you.

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Ep 45. Getting Ready to Get Ready
What would it be like if the floors, instead of just holding us up, actually helped us with our work? What if we could learn to make the walls, benches, desks, and tools active partners in our performance?

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Many people think they know what a visual workplace is. But it is so much more than is commonly understood. For one thing, visuality is a way to ensure that work not only gets done but that the physical work environment becomes an active partner in achieving work outcomes. Join us this week as Gwendolyn Galsworth continues through the pages of her book, Work That Makes Sense. Setting the stage, she describes the role of management. Then she addresses value-add associates directly, recognizing their pre-existing expertise and describes the further contribution they can make by learning how to think visually. After a clear definition of a visual workplace, Galsworth points out that visuality in the community is everywhere—but rarely in the workplace. Rarely does the workplace speak.

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